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Author Topic: A new frying pan  (Read 1713 times)

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MSL

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A new frying pan
« on: April 04, 2016, 01:52:25 AM »

Our new small frying pan

  Just a photo of our new small Frying pan:
. Small,cute and convenient. :)
A fan of science, philosophy and so on. :)

mojo

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Re: A new frying pan
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2016, 02:12:37 AM »
I've a set of these I use a lot. Along with what is known as a 'dutch oven'. The trick is to keep the seasoning in the pan in good condition. Under normal use, over time, a black coating develops, which is the seasoning. It reduces sticking and is the original non-stick ware.

Today most skillets come preseasoned. However one of the things they no longer do is to smooth the pan, so you have a lot of pits in the metal. Back in the days of the beginning of the Industrial Age, practice was to grind and sand it smooth as part of the manufacturing process.

Since cast iron never really wears out, you can go into some of the used shops and some times find earlier examples of this for sale. You won't find them for sale new this way.

As long as you don't drop them or shock them with going from hot to cold, they will last you a lifetime.

There's lots of ways to take care of them and to help seasoning along. One of the ways I learned was to just wipe them out, without putting them into water. Next time you cook with it, it destroys  any bacterial that might be in it. It allows the seasoning to build up faster. You can also do the seasoning through other methods that speed up the process. I've used the food consumption type flax seed oil before to do this. You wipe the oil in but not thick, put it in the oven  and set it at around 250 F until the oil dries out.

One of the main reasons not to use water for cleaning is the water gets in those pores. This is turn creates a condition for rust to develop. If you must wash in water, then don't let it dry out on a dish rack. Instead, put it on the stove again to dry the pores out and then wipe a light coat of oil over it to prevent rusting.
When you put down the good things you ought to have done, and leave out the bad ones you did do — well, that’s Memoirs. ~ Will Rogers

MSL

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Re: A new frying pan
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2016, 12:52:02 AM »
Useful knowledge. Thanks! I'll keep in mind.
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mojo

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Re: A new frying pan
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2016, 03:19:28 AM »
One other thing I should mention. I've actually destroyed the seasoning on my large frying pan. What happened was using too much acidic foods such as tomatoes and then simmering for long periods. The black that is the factory seasoning just disappeared, leaving behind a bare cast iron. This is why I had to re season the pan.

Just something you should be aware of is that high acidic foods can and will remove the seasoning.
When you put down the good things you ought to have done, and leave out the bad ones you did do — well, that’s Memoirs. ~ Will Rogers

mojo

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Re: A new frying pan
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2016, 03:33:40 AM »
Sorry for the continuing post but since we can't edit I'll just have to make another post.

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When you have something stick in the bottom of the pan, my trick to remove it easily, rather than having to scrub it hard, is take a small bit of water while the pan is still hot but the food has been removed. Just put a small amount in from a glass and then use a spatula to scrape with. It'll come right out. The pan needs to be hot enough to create a small amount of steam when you do this. The water will bubble and dance but not soak in. Pour out the water when it's done, wipe it with a pad of paper towels to remove the water, put it back on the burner to remove the water from the pits of metal, then wipe down with cooking oil while it is still warm. (I use olive oil but any cooking oil will work)
When you put down the good things you ought to have done, and leave out the bad ones you did do — well, that’s Memoirs. ~ Will Rogers

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Re: A new frying pan
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2016, 04:48:45 AM »
It's okay to add more information anytime you have some. It's a common practice here someone to respond under his/her own posts. I personally even like it, as long as it's not flood (posting the same text more than once). :)

I don't know how profitable possibly it may be, but here is the idea: you have got enough knowledge and skills about the frying pans to write a book. An e-book is the cheapest variant. If you write some book, don't forget to leave a link here. We'll be more than happy to promote your books! :)
I'm so good at SEO!

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