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PageRank

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Lucid dreams
« on: March 12, 2016, 06:28:03 AM »

About the lucid dreaming and the lucid dreaming techniques


I'm thinking recently about it. Lucid dreams, lucid dreaming. What's this? A lucid dream definition:
Quote
A lucid dream is any dream during which the dreamer is aware that they are dreaming.
During lucid dreaming, the dreamer may allegedly be able to exert some degree of control over the dream characters, narrative, and environment.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucid_dream https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_Unported_License

Lucid dreaming techniques


Learning to have lucid dreams is possible, as far as I know, because there are some lucid dreaming techniques. Here comes a collection of these techniques, which I see as meaningful and appropriate:
  • Do a few reality checks each day -- such as asking yourself "Am I dreaming?"
  • Try to find something very unusual in the place, where you're. For example, if there is a bush or a bird in your WC and you never had them there, probably you're dreaming.
  • Try to read something twice. If the script/the content is different/changing, then most probably you're dreaming.
  • See what's the time 2-3 times. If the time is different (like 11:34 and after it 14:54, 17:41, etc.), most probably you're sleeping.
  • Try to remember what happened 1-2 minutes ago. If you don't remember, then most probably it's a dream.
  • Look at your hands longer. In the dreams their appearance is dynamic (changing; not the same). I tried once and I had a lucid dream!
  • You can try the same way, if you look longer at the face/s of the people you know. In the dream their faces may become different, changing or just to be face of somebody else. For example your husband looks like your father or your mother looks like your neighbor.
  • If you are traveling and you arrived at once (or comparatively fast) from one place to another, most probably you're dreaming. (For example, you're in a car and in a second you're already in another village, town, city, country, mountain... planet.)
  • Try to make a magic action: make the red apple purple during you watch it; wave your hands and fly... If it happen, you're dreaming, of course.
  • Think what's very unusual, very illogical. Let's say you're in another home and you have no idea, when you came there, what's the address of this home, in which village/town/city is it, why you're there. In such a case, you probably are dreaming.
I think these 10 points are good enough for your lucid dreaming practice. I'd be glad to see your opinion and to read about your experience, if you have some.
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Re: Lucid dreams
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2016, 06:39:29 AM »
'Only' ten points, but very good ones! 8)
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mojo

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Re: Lucid dreams
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2016, 09:14:29 AM »
Quote from: PageRank
If you are traveling and you arrived at once (or comparatively fast) from one place to another, most probably you're dreaming. (For example, you're in a car and in a second you're already in another village, town, city, country, mountain... planet.)

I will share something with you from my life. Bare with my wanders, in the end it very much ties into the quote above.

When I was a teenager, I always had problems going to sleep. I knew what the problem was, just not how to address it. The problem was an active mind. In order to sleep, one must be mentally calm to achieve sleep.

I stumbled upon a way to quiet the mind but was not wise enough to see where that might lead as unforeseen side effect. The way to quiet the mind that I adopted was basically a form of self hypnosis. A way to get the whole body to relax as well.

It started simple enough, get into a comfortable body position in bed, and start a mental process of telling the body muscles to relax, one by one, over and over. When that one muscle responded, move to the next and work through the whole body, including the brain. Over the months, this became a nightly habit. The self hypnosis part came in that while mentally and silently doing this, one closed their eyes and looked as far upward as possible through the closed eyelids. This has the effect of straining the eye muscles, which in turn induces the self hypnosis.

Over the months of practice I got really good at it, the time it took to do this dropping rapidly until I achieved a state of the feeling of floating above the bed by 6 inches or so, perfectly relaxed. As I continued to practice this the times it took to achieve this state became shorter and shorter.

I was also going ot college at the time. Being poor, I worked and paid my way through school but it wasn't easy. I lived about an hour's drive from the college and could not afford to buy a car, nor to pay for dorm fees to stay on campus. So I bused 50 miles every day, there and in the evening back. This worked fine with two exceptions. I had night classes 2 times a week. So I borrowed the family car for those two nights.

I remember on the way home, leaving a small town. From that point till arriving at the home town city limits, I remember nothing else. Thing is in this route home are some serious turns. Any one of which could have put me in the trees or off a high embankment. It literally scared me to no end that I had entered this relaxed state through highway hypnosis, without knowing it happened or occurred till arrival.

Today I am very much scared to drive anywhere on the open highways because of being able to go into this relaxed state. One can not unlearn what one has learned. I no longer drive when alone anywhere long distance. It's too easy to slip into this state of relaxation and too dangerous to ignore.
When you put down the good things you ought to have done, and leave out the bad ones you did do — well, that’s Memoirs. ~ Will Rogers

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Re: Lucid dreams
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2016, 04:59:51 PM »
That's right and correct. We should drive responsibly. 8)
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Re: Lucid dreams
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2016, 05:29:46 PM »
 An online QQ-friend of mine said:
Quote
I am benefited by reading this article. Thank you :)
   :D
 Well, I'm trying to achieve this, but seems I haven't developed habit to try it in my dream (during I dream something). It's like I dream I post in this forum something and I'm just posting, without any wish to as myself "Is it a dream or it's real?" :):).
 I also have this 'active mind' problem, which Mojo mentioned above. Not every time, but 'sometimes'-to-'often'. And I know it's not easy to fall asleep, if you're thinking actively about something or/and worry about something.
 Totally agreed about driving and responsibility. One of the reason I don't have a car is that it's full of risks here (and not only here): even you keep the rules 100%, there are other drivers, passers-by, who are not so careful and not that responsible. (Other reasons are I don't want to spend money for so many things like insurances, gasoline, road tax, carwash/car wash and so on).
 About the unlearning I do not completely agree. I think the healthy people can't unlearn something completely, but they can unlearn most of it. For example when one don't use a certain language long time, then he/she can forget many of the words. Or I'll give an example of the martial arts -- I didn't practice a kick 2-3 years and when I tried a month ago, I found out I have to learn it almost from the A-B-C level. ;D
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Re: Lucid dreams
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2016, 07:39:56 PM »
There's a difference between unlearning and getting rusty at something from lack of practice. Much of our learning, especially the physical part, comes from muscle memory. The brain learns to use muscles in a certain pattern. Then when it is no longer needed, they fade over time.

When you try it one time after years of neglect, you find out it no longer works as mindlessly as it did before. You actually have to concentrate going through the motions. But the difference here between having learned it once before and approaching something brand new you've never done, is that you have an intimate understanding of how to achieve that skill again. If you pay attention to it, the advancement back to the state you lost is far more quick than having never learned something.

I took typing in high school. I really didn't have any interest in typing, I went to the class because that's where all the girls were. This was long before computers made it into the education system. We learned typing on typewriters. Never used a typewriter again after that was over. 20 or 30 years later along comes the computer with the same qwerty layout but I had lost all the skills for typing from non-use. It took me about a month or two to change from 'two finger flying on the keyboard' to full two handed use of the keyboard because I knew the basics of how to go about typing. This you don't forget. You don't unlearn it; it just lays dormant until you need it.
When you put down the good things you ought to have done, and leave out the bad ones you did do — well, that’s Memoirs. ~ Will Rogers

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Re: Lucid dreams
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2016, 02:58:39 PM »
Quote from: mojo
I really didn't have any interest in typing, I went to the class because that's where all the girls were.
Believe me, it's a true and real interest! :D
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Re: Lucid dreams
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2016, 01:01:45 AM »
 We learned at some psychology class that it's the so called indirect interest, to technically -- yes, it is an interest. :P For example: you're fishing, because you like fishing (direct interest); you're fishing, because you find this is a perfect way to stay away from your noisy wife (indirect interest). :)
 On-topic: I had 2 lucid dreams recently. I did it via the techniques "look at my hands" and "try to fly or do something fantastic in the dream (like teleportation*)". :)

____
* Teleportation: "Teleportation, or Teletransportation, is the theoretical transfer of matter or energy from one point to another without traversing the physical space between them. It is a common subject of science fiction literature, film, video games, and television."https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teleportation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_Attribution-ShareAlike_3.0_Unported_License
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