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Author Topic: SEO science  (Read 22448 times)

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SEO

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All SEO!
« Reply #15 on: February 17, 2011, 10:21:50 PM »
Well said, Marcrnandez ! "All SEO". I like it!  8) I'll do my best to show you ALL SEO  :D
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CONTENT FARM
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2011, 03:17:12 AM »
 

Content farm

In the context of the World Wide Web, a content farm is a company that employs large numbers of often freelance writers to generate large amounts of textual content which is specifically designed to satisfy algorithms for maximal retrieval by automated search engines. Their main goal is to generate advertising revenue.
The articles in content farms often poach from other media sources, leading to disputes over copyright infringement. They are written by human beings but may not be written by a specialist in the area. Proponents of the content farms claim that from a business perspective, traditional journalism is inefficient: stories are chosen by a small group of people that frequently have similar experiences and outlooks. Content farms often commission their writers' work based on analysis of search engine queries that proponents represent as "true market demand", a feature that traditional journalism lacks.
Content farms are criticized for providing relatively low quality content as they maximize profit by producing just "good enough" rather than best possible quality articles. Authors are aware that the quality is not that good. Search engines see content farms as a problem, as they tend to bring the user to the less relevant and lower quality results of the search. Because of the attempt to deliver as much as possible and as cheaply as possible, content farms are called "McDonalds online".
In one of Google's promotional videos for search, the majority of the links available were reported to be produced at content farms.
Content farms contain huge number of articles. For instance, Demand Media will soon be publishing 1 million items a month, the equivalent of four English-language Wikipedias a year. Big content farms are expensive resources, sold for many millions.
A content farm writer usually gets only several dollars per article yet produces many articles per day and may earn enough for living. A typical content writer is a female with children that contrasts with sites expecting voluntary unpaid contribution for the sake of idea, where the typical writer is an unmarried (single) male.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Content_farm
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patelrocky

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Re: SEO science
« Reply #17 on: March 10, 2011, 03:07:20 PM »
I like your forum post. I got to know about the history of seo science on the this page
Seo Services

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Patelrocky
« Reply #18 on: March 12, 2011, 02:43:55 AM »
Patelrocky, welcome here, in our SEO and Non-SEO forums! You may post your SEO Services also in our SEO-Social Network and our SEO directory:D And now I'll go on to write about the SEO science over here.  :)
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White hat, Grey hat and Black hat SEO
« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2011, 02:59:43 AM »
   White hat and Black hat SEO. Let's learn more about them here.

White or black hat


In recent years, the terms white hat and black hat have been applied to the Search Engine Optimization (SEO) industry. Black hat SEO tactics such as spamdexing, attempt to redirect search results to particular target pages in a fashion that is against the search engines' terms of service, whereas white hat methods are generally approved by the search engines. White hats tend to produce results that last a long time, whereas black hats anticipate that their sites may eventually be banned either temporarily or permanently once the search engines discover what they are doing.
Some of the blackhat SEO tactics include: keyword stuffing, hidden text and links, doorway and cloaked pages, link farming and blog comment spam.

White Hat Marketing

White hat marketing applies the White hat SEO techniques, also known as ethical SEO. The white hat marketing implies that all SEO activities are carried out while conforming to the guidelines, rules and policies of search engines. It is an ethical guideline since all site managers abide to the written, as well as unwritten rules and guidelines for SEO. Some of these guidelines are:

-Providing relevant keywords that cater for short and long tails results
-Updating the content regularly
-Analysing search results analytics reports and take corrective actions as required
-Providing links to other websites as well as requesting other networks to link to this website

Black Hat Marketing

Black hat marketing involves SEO activities that are against the norms of search engines. Hence, black hat marketing is unethical. It is difficult for the search engine alone to distinguish when black hat SEO is applied. Competitors can play a role by reporting cases of black hat marketing to the search engines, who will in turn ban or penalise the website. Despite the risk of ban, marketers still can go for black hat marketing because it helps in boosting up the page location in search result. Example of Black hat marketing are:

-keyword stuffing - keywords can be provided, among others, in meta tags,alt tags, comment tags, as invisible text to human eyes. By overusing the same keywords throughout a web page, search engines algorithm, that reads keywords, will drive the web page up in its search result.

-doorway and cloaked pages - web site contain web pages that are listed in search result. However, when entering these pages, users are redirected to other pages. Hence, the search result contents do not match the page displayed to users.
-link farming
-hiding text - Hiding text in the page or website is also considered as black hat seo technique. This technique is considered as spam and search engine can ban the website.

Gray Hat Marketing

Gray hat marketing lies between white hat marketing and black hat marketing. Here, the site owner provides greater risks than white hat marketing, by disobeying to some of the search engine guidelines, but at the same time ensures limited disobediance so as not to fail into black hat marketing. For example, gray hat marketing may involve a keyword density higher than required but not too excessive.

Website involved in gray hat marketing may face penalty but may be safe from ban.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_or_black_hat
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Squeeze page
« Reply #20 on: March 13, 2011, 08:17:42 PM »
  I will write something about the squeeze page in "Internet". I mention it here, as far as the squeeze pages got something in common with the SEO (Search Engine Optimisation).
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Backlink | Backlinks
« Reply #21 on: April 08, 2011, 04:22:42 AM »
Backlink (-s)

Backlinks are incoming links to a website or web page. Inbound links were originally important (prior to the emergence of search engines) as a primary means of web navigation; today their significance lies in search engine optimization (SEO). The number of backlinks is one indication of the popularity or importance of that website or page (for example, this is used by Google to determine the PageRank of a webpage). Outside of SEO, the backlinks of a webpage may be of significant personal, cultural or semantic interest: they indicate who is paying attention to that page.
In basic link terminology, a backlink is any link received by a web node (web page, directory, website, or top level domain) from another web node. Backlinks are also known as incoming links, inbound links, inlinks, and inward links.
Search engine rankings
Search engines often use the number of backlinks that a website has as one of the most important factors for determining that website's search engine ranking, popularity and importance. Google's description of their PageRank system, for instance, notes that Google interprets a link from page A to page B as a vote, by page A, for page B. Knowledge of this form of search engine rankings has fueled a portion of the SEO industry commonly termed linkspam, where a company attempts to place as many inbound links as possible to their site regardless of the context of the originating site.
Websites often employ various techniques (called search engine optimization, usually shortened to SEO) to increase the number of backlinks pointing to their website. Some methods are free for use by everyone whereas some methods like linkbaiting requires quite a bit of planning and marketing to work. Some websites stumble upon "linkbaiting" naturally; the sites that are the first with a tidbit of 'breaking news' about a celebrity are good examples of that. When "linkbait" happens, many websites will link to the 'baiting' website because there is information there that is of extreme interest to a large number of people.
There are several factors that determine the value of a backlink. Backlinks from authoritative sites on a given topic are highly valuable.
If both sites have content geared toward the keyword topic, the backlink is considered relevant and believed to have strong influence on the search engine rankings of the webpage granted the backlink. A backlink represents a favorable 'editorial vote' for the receiving webpage from another granting webpage. Another important factor is the anchor text of the backlink. Anchor text is the descriptive labeling of the hyperlink as it appears on a webpage. Search engine bots (i.e., spiders, crawlers, etc.) examine the anchor text to evaluate how relevant it is to the content on a webpage. Anchor text and webpage content congruency are highly weighted in search engine results page (SERP) rankings of a webpage with respect to any given keyword query by a search engine user.
Increasingly, inbound links are being weighed against link popularity and originating context. This transition is reducing the notion of one link, one vote in SEO, a trend proponents hope will help curb linkspam as a whole.

It should also be noted that building too many backlinks over a short period of time can get a website's ranking penalized, and in extreme cases, the website is de-indexed altogether. Anything above a couple of hundred a day is considered "dangerous".

TechnicalWhen HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language) was designed, there was no explicit mechanism in the design to keep track of backlinks in software, as this carried additional logistical and network overhead.

Some website software internally keeps track of backlinks. Examples of this include most wiki and CMS software.

Most commercial search engines provide a mechanism to determine the number of backlinks they have recorded to a particular web page. For example, Google can be searched using link:wikipedia.org to find the number of pages on the Web pointing to http://wikipedia.org/. To find link information on Yahoo type linkdomain:http://www.wikipedia.org. Google only shows a small fraction of the number of links pointing to a site. It credits many more backlinks than it shows for each website.

Other mechanisms have been developed to track backlinks between disparate webpages controlled by organizations that aren't associated with each other. The most notable example of this is TrackBacks between blogs.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backlink
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"Click here"
« Reply #22 on: May 16, 2011, 02:26:19 PM »

"Click here"



"Click here" is a verb phrase that may be used as the anchor text of a hyperlink on a web page. The World Wide Web Consortium, through its Quality Tips for Webmasters, advises web designers to avoid using "click here" for this purpose.

Jakob Nielsen, a leading web usability pundit, says, "Don't use 'click here' or other non-descriptive link text."

Search indexing
Search engines use anchor text to index the content of a linked-to site. For example, a site that is linked with the same anchor text phrase by many other sites may appear towards the top of searches for that phrase. Some bloggers have speculated that using "click here" in lieu of a descriptive name is a poor search engine optimization practice.

Accessibility and device dependence

Screen readers, used by the visually impaired, can read out only the hyperlinks on the page as a quick method of navigation. Usability and accessibility firm Webcredible advises avoiding non-descriptive link text such as "click here" at all costs, as it makes no sense out of context.

Users may want to print web pages for reference. "Click here" is inapplicable on the printed page. For this reason, Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the Web, advises web designers to try to avoid references in the text to online aspects.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Click_here
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SEO and the speed time
« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2011, 11:57:14 PM »
Speed time is one of the algorithms.

"Slow sites may be penalized by search engines." (http://www.alexa.com)
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the speed time
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2011, 07:01:14 PM »
Speed time is one of the algorithms.

"Slow sites may be penalized by search engines." (http://www.alexa.com)


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Re: SEO science
« Reply #25 on: June 12, 2011, 12:35:37 AM »
Thanks for sharing good SEO information  :)

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SEO friend
« Reply #26 on: June 12, 2011, 02:19:03 PM »
Thanks for sharing good SEO information  :)

 Welcome SEO friend. And you're welcome :)
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The Duplicate Content Penalty Myth
« Reply #27 on: June 22, 2011, 01:15:20 PM »

The Duplicate Content Penalty Myth

Mar 15, 2007 at 10:00am ET by Jill Whalen

http://searchengineland.com/the-duplicate-content-penalty-myth-10741

One thing that has plagued the SEO industry for years has been a lack of consistency when it comes to SEO terms and definitions. One of the most prevalent misnomers being bandied about is the phrase "duplicate content penalty." I’m here to tell you that there is no such thing as a search engine penalty for duplicate content. At least not the way many people believe there is.

Don’t get me wrong; I’m not saying that the search engines like and appreciate duplicate content — they don’t. But they don’t specifically penalize websites that happen to have some duplicate content.

Duplicate content has been and always will be a natural part of the Web. It’s nothing to be afraid of. If your site has some dupe content for whatever reason, you don’t have to lose sleep every night worrying about the wrath of the Google gods. They’re not going to shoot lightning bolts at your site from the sky, nor are they going to banish your entire website from ever showing up when someone searches for what you offer. The duplicate content probably won’t show up in searches, but that’s not the same thing as a penalty.

Let me explain.

The search engines want to index and show to their users (the searchers) as much unique content as algorithmically possible. That’s their job, and they do it quite well considering what they have to work with: spammers using invisible or irrelevant content, technically challenged websites that crawlers can’t easily find, copycat scraper sites that exist only to obtain AdSense clicks, and a whole host of other such nonsense.

There’s no doubt that duplicate content is a problem for search engines. If a searcher is looking for a particular type of product or service and is presented with pages and pages of results that provide the same basic information, then the engine has failed to do its job properly. In order to supply its users with a variety of information on their search query, search engines have created duplicate content "filters" (not penalties) that attempt to weed out the information they already know about. Certainly, if your page is one of those that is filtered, it may very well feel like a penalty to you, but it’s not – it’s a filter.

Search engine penalties are reserved for pages and sites that are purposely attempting to trick the search engines in one form or another. Penalties can be meted out algorithmically when obvious deceptions exist on a page, or they can be personally handed out by a search engineer who discovers an infraction through spam reports and other means. To many people’s surprise, penalties rarely happen to the average website. Most that receive a penalty know exactly what they did to deserve it.

Honestly, the search engines are not out to get you. Matt Cutts isn’t plotting new ways to take food off your table. If you have a page on your site that sells red widgets and another very similar page selling blue widgets, you aren’t going to find your site banished off the face of Google because of this. The worst thing that will happen is that only the red widget page may show up in the search results instead of both pages showing up.

On the other hand, if you’ve created a Mad Libs spam site — i.e., one that uses a pre-written template where specific keyword phrases are substituted out for other ones — the pages in question might get filtered out completely. Not so much because of their dupe content (although that’s part of it), but because it’s search engine spam (low-quality pages with little value to people, created solely for search engine rankings).

The bottom line is that the engines are actively seeking out lousy content and removing it from their main results. If this sounds like your site, don’t be surprised to wake up one day and find you’ve lost some or all of your rankings. It’s time to bite the bullet and use them as PPC landing pages instead. There’s definitely some irony in the fact that those types of pages are welcome in Google if you’re willing to pay for each clickthrough you receive, but those are obvious moneymaker pages, and Google has a right to demand their cut.

Regionalized pages are another duplicate-content "spam" model that has been losing ground with the engines lately. Those consist of hundreds of pages/sites selling the same basic thing, but they are targeted to every city in the US. Unfortunately, there’s no easy answer to how to create high-quality pages that do the same thing.

Suffice it to say that just about any content that is easily created without much human intervention (i.e., automated) is not a great candidate for organic SEO purposes.

Another duplicate-content issue that many are concerned about is the republishing of online articles. Reprinting someone’s article on your site is not going to cause a penalty. At best, your page with the article will show up in a search related to it; at worst, it won’t. No big deal either way.

If your own bylined articles are getting published elsewhere, that’s a good thing. There’s no need for you to provide a different version to other sites or to not allow them to be republished at all. The more sites that host your article, the more chances you will have to build your credibility as well as to gain links back to your site through a short bio at the end of the article. If the site your article is hosted on shows up instead of yours, so be it. There’s nothing wrong with that, as your site can be easily clicked to from your bio; the pros far outweigh the cons. In many cases, Google still shows numerous instances of articles in searches, but even if they eventually show only one version, that’s still okay.

When it comes to duplicate content, the search engines are not penalizing you or thinking that you’re a spammer; they’re simply trying to show some variety in their search results pages.

Jill Whalen is owner of High Rankings, a search engine optimization firm founded in 1995. She speaks and writes regularly on SEO issues and also maintains the High Ranking Forums, where the community over of 10,000 members discusses SEO topics. The 100% Organic column appears Thursdays at Search Engine Land.

Opinions expressed in the article are those of the guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land.


http://searchengineland.com/the-duplicate-content-penalty-myth-10741

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Testing your website in multiple browsers
« Reply #28 on: June 27, 2011, 05:58:24 PM »
Internet is not only SEO!

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Authority Sites
« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2011, 09:31:08 PM »

Authority Sites

What are they?
I will not write about SEO, but about love, food, UFO, sport, psychology, paranormal and everything else I like.

 

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